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May Headstrong Daughters by Nadia Jamal — Candid real-life stories from women torn between two cultures. Shan quickly realizes that the murders pose a riddle the Chinese police might in fact be trying to cover up. When he discovers that a nearby village has been converted into a new internment camp for Tibetan dissidents arrested in Beijing's latest pacification campaign, Shan recognizes the dangerous landscape he has entered.

To find justice for the victims and to protect an American woman who witnessed the murders, Shan must navigate through the treacherous worlds of the internment camp, the local criminal gang, and the government's rabid pacification teams, while coping with his growing doubts about his own identity and role in Tibet. Hardcover , pages. Published November 27th by Minotaur Books first published November 1st To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Mandarin Gate , please sign up.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. Apr 08, P. Lindsay rated it it was amazing Shelves: How nice, another inspector Shan story. Well, it's a story about Tibet really and what is happening in Tibet and that made me so angry and so sad. From the fictional point of view this is another good solid piece of writing from a writer who chooses his words carefully and puts them together with a poet's ear. The story is dramatic and the plot twists and jinks so that it is very hard to outguess Shan as he tries to sort out why one lama dies and who killed the three bodies found in the old conven How nice, another inspector Shan story.

The story is dramatic and the plot twists and jinks so that it is very hard to outguess Shan as he tries to sort out why one lama dies and who killed the three bodies found in the old convent. The behaviour of the Chinese government officials is as sickening as ever. The possible plot they have put together is all too realistic and highly likely.

And I did find Shan's relationship with the Lieutenant sad, bound to be doomed! For those readers who know nothing of Tibet the novel gives a clear picture of what is happening now, in truth! For anyone who likes a whodunnit set in exotic surroundings this is a good book to read.

For the fans of Shan here is another well written tale to add to their bookshelves. If I had my way I'd make every person who thinks and cares read the first novel in the series - 'The Skull Mantra' and then this one. Then I'd ask them to get up and protest loudly about the Chinese government's foul lack of human rights policies and appalling treatment of Tibetans. Mar 27, Marie rated it really liked it. Not a solid four, as other books I've read by Pattison have been. The stories are fantastic. Pattison has a couple of series, one set in present day former Tibet, the other set in Revolutionary War times in the territory of the original colonies.

I've read several of the Tibetan stories. The books set in Chinese occupied Tibet feature a former police inspector, Shan Tao Yun from Beijing, who crossed a party official in the past and ended up in one of the worst of the gulags in China for several ye Not a solid four, as other books I've read by Pattison have been. The books set in Chinese occupied Tibet feature a former police inspector, Shan Tao Yun from Beijing, who crossed a party official in the past and ended up in one of the worst of the gulags in China for several years.

While there, he befriended some Tibetan monks who made up the majority of the prisoners in this particular place. Since Shan's parole, he has been working as inspector of sewer systems in a remote Himalayan province, which suits him because of his proximity with the Tibetans he came to identify with.

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Of course, he also carries on with solving crimes while trying to remain under the vindictive official's radar. The modern day Tibetan society is not romanticized; it's multifaceted. There are white hats and black hats and everything in between, as would be expected in any group of human beings. Murders, thefts of cultural artifacts, destruction of monasteries, graft This particular book was weaker than the others I had read.

The narrative dragged beyond the author's usual almost contemplative tone. The brutality the Tibetans were subjected to, the rogue lama, the cover-ups, the danger of everyday life -- all of these were plausible. Shan getting himself arrested to go to a particular prison in order to rescue his Tibetan friend and an American woman -- and succeeding etcetera -- were just not, sorry, believable at all. So three and a half. Jan 06, Shomeret rated it liked it Shelves: Inspector Shan, once a crime investigator in Beijing, is now to quote him "an official damned inspector of dams" in Tibet.

There were some wonderful characters and some interesting Buddhist practices, but from a plot perspective, I could have wished for more believability. Readers are asked to swallow some incredible stupidity on the part of the Chinese regime in Mandarin Gate. I am willing to believe that Chinese government functionaries can be corrupt, but not idiotic. Chinese government decis Inspector Shan, once a crime investigator in Beijing, is now to quote him "an official damned inspector of dams" in Tibet. Chinese government decisions described in this book contradict what I know about their established policies.

In the United States, authorities try to break up youth gangs by not allowing gang members to associate with each other as a probation requirement. In the case of the Chinese government,this is especially unlikely considering that Beijing normally breaks up the families of criminals and dissidents. The group of dissident intellectuals who were sent with their families to the same settlement is another example that contradicts this policy. It boggled my mind that it didn't occur to the bureaucrats in Beijing that these particular decisions could cause them a great deal of trouble.

I know that we are supposed to suspend disbelief for fiction, but there are limits. Pattison owes me new suspenders. My current set of disbelief suspenders are completely ruined. For the version of this review that appears on my blog, see my January post "Behind Eliot Pattison's Mandarin Gate" at http: Jan 11, CarolineFromConcord rated it really liked it. I really love this mystery writer. He has two series. The older series is about Shan, a Chinese detective, cast off from China and in love with Tibet.

The series is powerful and troubling. The author knows a lot about Tibet. I suspect his visits there in the s were for a Western government. He remains deeply alarmed by the Chinese campaign to wipe out a culture, a language, and a religion, but he always has at least one Chinese character who is different from the government. In this mystery I really love this mystery writer. In this mystery there are several "good Chinese. As in Pattison's other mysteries, the ending is satisfying, but we know the abuse goes on. The love interest was totally new for the series.

If you like the Shan books, you may also like Pattison's series about 18th C America and the Indians, whose culture, language, and religion other colonial empires are trying to wipe out. And once more, a representative of the oppressing country learns and loves the native ways and helps the people to the extent possible. Mar 17, LynnB rated it really liked it. I always enjoy this series. They may be a bit hard to follow sometimes, but I think that's pretty realistic as the Chinese takeover of Tibet is described. I haven't read one of this series in awhile, but I believe this book is particularly good in describing the impact that the takeover has on the individual Tibetans.

It really does remind me of what happened with the Native Americans in the US. No more religion, no more culture, no more land, no more family structures, and constant "re-educatio I always enjoy this series.

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No more religion, no more culture, no more land, no more family structures, and constant "re-education". So - if that interests you as well as mysteries, this is a series for you. May 26, Wal. Dort allerdings erwarten ihn keine Informationen, sondern er muss mit Grauen feststellen, dass im Innenhof drei weitere Menschen den Tod gefunden haben. Shan, der ehemalige Ermittler in Peking in Ungnade gefallen und dem Gulag entkommen, beginnt seine Nachforschungen. Ein tibetischer Staat, das tibetische Volk - beides soll mit Freude im chinesischen Staat untergehen. Verschwindet jemand, gibt es keine Sicherheit, ob er je wieder auftauchen wird.

Doch der stille Widerstand der Tibeter und auch Shans intelligent ausgefeilte Ideen, die Wege der Macht zu Gunsten der Schwachen auszunutzen, lassen einen hoffen, dass noch nicht alles verloren ist. Dec 25, Margaret Sankey rated it liked it. Pattison's former Inspector Shan is a post-Cold War, Chinese character in the mold of Martin Cruz Smith's Arkady Renko--a Beijing detective who crossed the wrong politician and ended up in a Tibetan prison camp, from which he was called to sort out further embarrassing crimes and protests against the Chinese occupation.

In this volume, Shan is out of the gulag, tasked as a ditch inspector among the Tibetan people who have grown to accept him as a reasonable person who is just as disgusted by the Pattison's former Inspector Shan is a post-Cold War, Chinese character in the mold of Martin Cruz Smith's Arkady Renko--a Beijing detective who crossed the wrong politician and ended up in a Tibetan prison camp, from which he was called to sort out further embarrassing crimes and protests against the Chinese occupation.

In this volume, Shan is out of the gulag, tasked as a ditch inspector among the Tibetan people who have grown to accept him as a reasonable person who is just as disgusted by the regime as they are, but who lives under the constant threat of punishment. The suicide death of a monk leads to the discovery of three more murders, a missing American woman who had been taking pictures of religious suppression, and a "pioneer" community of exiled academics, a southern Chinese street gang and forcibly transplanted nomad shepherds--all of whom the Chinese "knobs" assume won't work together and can be manipulated.

This is a fine addition to the bookshelf of morally compromised detectives, with the subtleties of what is really truth, justice and right seldom overlapping. Nov 11, Derek rated it liked it. Another solid entry in Pattison's Inspector Chan series. In this case, I read more for the fascinating descriptions of Tibet than for the mysteries, but the mysteries hold their own.

I read this immediately following Bone Rattler , which Pattison sets in his own country's history, and I find I prefer his take on Tibet than the history with which he is probably more familiar. Feb 16, Pat rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a particularly good addition in the series as it introduced a new character Lieutenant Meng.

I hope she will return in another book and add to the help Shan receives from some very unlikely people. Highly recommend this book and the entire series. Oct 21, Fran rated it it was amazing. Once a formidable Inspector stationed in Beijing, finally released from a work camp hoping to create some type of life for himself. But, the story opens in an unusual way where he meets him and two monks getting ready for a celebration and the reopening of a shrine.

As one monk is chasing a thief and hopes to get back his bounty, Shan and Lokesh the other monk assist him in his quest. But, what happens next will n Mandarin Gate: But, what happens next will not only surprise Shan but also create a serious void in his heart and life. But, the tables turn deadly as the monk prays, says his final words and uses the gun on himself. Fearful, sad and knowing that the death had to be hidden or more would follow in a different way, Shan and Lokesh plan on the burial and find a way to hide what some might find out anyway.

But, not before Shan spies the police in the Tibetan township and comes face to face with a heinous crime scene and much more. Status matters in this world and according to the Chinese government those without official identity do not have the freedom to move about and Shan cannot return to his home in Beijing and lives among the outlawed Buddhist Monks. As the new Inspector of irrigation and sewer ditches, a job, not that vital or important, he falls upon this scene.

Jamyang must have as Shan contemplates had some great agony in life that propelled him to take his own. If his death is not hidden, the death of an unregistered monk dying of a bullet self inflicted in his head would definitely flag a red alert to the Chinese police. If as he states the knobs will learn of it, then those in Public Security would use it as an excuse to ship more to the camps.

Lokesh would set about the task of carrying him away to be cleaned and hopefully remove him before anyone notices. Meeting a Public Security lieutenant he learns more about what the police are looking at and the fresh crime scene he came upon. The scene an old Buddhist temple the victims two men and a nun arranged in the pattern of the letter U. The bodies mutilated, defiled and covered with red paint and their hands held down with a stone. As Shan assesses the crime scene more thoroughly as the police go off in a different direction he notices some important things about the murdered victims.

One thing for sure someone went to a lot of trouble to orchestrate the scene and not blood but red paint covered the bodies. As he looks closer at the male figures he finds something in a pocket, a striker flint and then a piece of paper he takes with him.


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What is the link to the lama that killed himself and why did the murders take place in the same exact spot? Jamyang cleaned the offerings and his demeanor sad, solemn. Saying goodbye to the deities, Shan realized he knew about the murders. With no direct supervisor over him he has more freedom to investigate the murders and what he learns from just his observations is quite compelling. Sitting at the wheel and lost in his thoughts he forgot it was a murder scene and yet he pictured the events in his mind. As you learn more about the officers, the officials and the government in this book you learn that in the Chinese Empire a member of any of the nine ranks of public officials are distinguished by the specific kind of button worn on their cap which defines them in Mandarin society.

When Shan meets a woman named Chemno he learns more about the redistribution centers, the transitions communities and the lives of those placed in these prisons without bars. What he is told is not really the truth as he witnesses the conditions with his own eyes when he visits the Clear Water Camp and sees it for himself. Learning that they converted an old army base into a pacification camp and sending children to work in the factories was eye opening for Shan.

Meeting with Jigten he learns even more. Reflecting on what happened with the police lieutenant and realizing there was more to her story and as she welcomed him to their model pioneer community and learns that someone stole the bodies and someone attacked her but who and why? Pain inflicted, gunshots and more were the usual in Tibet and Shan and Meng were now in the middle of what he the author refers to as a hailstorm of death you might say.

As he hopes to safe some and he meets a man named Yuan. Yuan Guo was a professor and his life was in Harbin. He established the Chinese History Department and married a professor. As they shared their lives he learned why the families were there, the threats made against their children and the fate of many others. As he learns more about the pacification camps and the people living there he realizes that he has entered once again a dangerous territory.

Justice needs to be found and Shan will not give up until he finds the truth behind the murders, protects Cora, the American woman, enters the world of the internment camps and finds himself embroiled with the criminals, pacification teams, the corruption in the government and a gang called the Jade Crow. All throughout the novel you begin to see different shades of Shan as he battle other demons within himself to learn and find just where he belongs. Author Eliot Pattison takes the reader inside the internment camps to see first hand the conditions, their lives and hear the voices of those sent there.

The author allows the reader to get to know Shan in-depth as he struggles to find his own way in Tibet, investigate the murders, help those in the internment camps and find his true identity and worth again. The pain inflicted, the tears shed and hopelessness all come through plus the first hand knowledge he offers the reader as someone who visited and still visits Tibet and has seen the conditions first hand. As the story continues we learn more about the cells of dissents, those transplanted to Tibet hoping they would not survive, and the pacification settlements and truth behind what is really going on in them and the conditions that the people live in.

There are threats made to those living there and there are concessions they have to make in order to protect their young. Shan then leads us back to the murders and the fact that the three bodies were stolen as he meets Professor Yuan and then the encounter with the gang. Attacked by the gang members, questioned about the murders and adding more information than he had before the tensions rise and the situation more volatile for Shan.

As we hear the voices of the abbots and learn more about what will happen if they come and interrogate them about the American who witnessed the murders. Just how can Shan help and why him? Shan delves deeper and we learn the truth behind what Cora and Rutger were filming and what was in the photos and videos.

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How would they show the Chinese that not everyone was blind to what they were doing? Deceits, thieves, murders, lies and much more comprise the lives of these people as they dig their way to survival but can they? There are so many issues brought to light by the author. Abuses against these people, lies told to them in order to survive, prison camps that were masked as internment camps supposedly to help these people have a better life. As one of the Jade Crow hears more truths than he cares to from Shan and the link to the dead lama is revealed and a secret about him uncovered many worlds would change.

Author Eliot Pattison reminds the reader that what is described in this book really happens, is happening now and is real. Take a trip inside the internment camps, hear the screams, feel the pain and understand the fears, customs, ways, myths, stories and lives of the people of Tibet and the dismantling of Tibet by the Chinese government over the last two generations.

Learn what the government of Beijing has done to destroy the culture and beauty that was once Tibet.

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But as Shan rides with the police, learns the ways of others, allows Public Security to beat and abuse him he loses sight of Shan. What story did Jamyang tell and what was in his journal? Take a picture the lens does not lie unless you doctor what is filmed or photographed what you see as you read this book will remind you just how blind is everyone to the truth?

One man would sacrifice his life for telling the truth but what happens will surprise the reader. A caste system that ranks people according to their position and presents them with a badge to wear for everyone to know their standing or ranking. An ending that will surprise the reader and a people that come together as one. Voices that will be heard and stories that will be recorded and told. Mar 14, Patricia rated it it was amazing. Number 7 in Eliot Pattison's Inspector Shan series is both a chilling mystery and a social commentary on the unimaginable, incomparable part of the world that is Tibet.

The author has an accurate grasp of Tibet, Tibetans, and the way things are at the roof of the world. I say this based on my own experiences and what I learned while traveling there. The quality of the writing remains superb and steady in all of his novels, including the Bone Rattler series about the American wilderness at the ti Number 7 in Eliot Pattison's Inspector Shan series is both a chilling mystery and a social commentary on the unimaginable, incomparable part of the world that is Tibet.

The quality of the writing remains superb and steady in all of his novels, including the Bone Rattler series about the American wilderness at the time of the French and Indian War, and the dystopian mystery Ashes of the Earth. The Shan series is an engaging and entertaining way to experience Tibet, and maybe the reader will be inspired to hang some prayer flags in honor of the Tibetans who struggle to survive. Aug 21, Marilyn rated it really liked it. This the first book of this detective series I have read.

It was so good because it really told me so much of the Chinese occupation of that land. That occupation is evil in its abuse of the culture and lives of Tibetans. The story was involving with characters to care about and missions to be passionate about. May 31, Marc Severson rated it it was amazing. Pattison has become my favorite author. The interplay of the strangeness of Tibet and its way of life juxtaposed against a good mystery novel always keeps me interested.

Jun 20, Shellie Layers of Thought rated it really liked it Shelves: Original review posted at Layers of Thought. Shan used to be a police inspector in Beijing, but was imprisoned in a remote Tibetan jail after he ran afoul of a powerful figure in the Chinese Government. After being unofficially released, he has to remain in Tibet without status or official identity, unable to return home to Beijing.